libawr:

(chart: where we donate vs diseases that kill us, via The truth about the Ice Bucket Challenge: Viral memes shouldn’t dictate our charitable giving - Vox)
For the record, I think the Ice Bucket Challenge is great.
Anything that motivates people to give - and to publicly talk about their giving, making it part of their online identities - helps to create a stronger culture of giving. I refuse to accept the argument that campaigns like this necessarily cannibalize other, “better,” giving; after all, while writing a check for $100 to the ALS Assn may compete with writing $100 checks to other orgs, it also competes with watching TV or online shopping or pretty much any other way we might spend our time or money.
Reaching folks who may not have donated otherwise is a good thing for every charity. But just as not every org can/should require an “Ice Bucket” moment (or whatever the most recent viral hit might be - remember Kony??) to be successful, not every potential donor requires clever gimmicks to motivate them to give. Ideally, some percentage of IBC donors will become more savvy and look at other factors next time - after all, the Challenge accomplished a lot of things, but cultivating repeat donors for ALS is probably not one of them.
So, for those of us looking for something beyond memes, this article is a great place to start.

libawr:

(chart: where we donate vs diseases that kill us, via The truth about the Ice Bucket Challenge: Viral memes shouldn’t dictate our charitable giving - Vox)

For the record, I think the Ice Bucket Challenge is great.

Anything that motivates people to give - and to publicly talk about their giving, making it part of their online identities - helps to create a stronger culture of giving. I refuse to accept the argument that campaigns like this necessarily cannibalize other, “better,” giving; after all, while writing a check for $100 to the ALS Assn may compete with writing $100 checks to other orgs, it also competes with watching TV or online shopping or pretty much any other way we might spend our time or money.

Reaching folks who may not have donated otherwise is a good thing for every charity. But just as not every org can/should require an “Ice Bucket” moment (or whatever the most recent viral hit might be - remember Kony??) to be successful, not every potential donor requires clever gimmicks to motivate them to give. Ideally, some percentage of IBC donors will become more savvy and look at other factors next time - after all, the Challenge accomplished a lot of things, but cultivating repeat donors for ALS is probably not one of them.

So, for those of us looking for something beyond memes, this article is a great place to start.

I keep seeing these videos with people in bathing suits and t-shirts, tank tops. For me personally, when I bring awareness to a charity, I prefer a more formal setting, so excuse me…

“You’re only given one little spark of madness. You mustn’t lose it."  - Robin Williams [July 29th 1951 - August 11th 2014]

You’re only given one little spark of madness. You mustn’t lose it."
Robin Williams
[July 29th 1951 - August 11th 2014]

(Source: peterhale)

"Genie, I’m gonna miss you.”

"Me too Al. No matter what anybody says, you’ll always be a prince to me.”

(Source: adisneysoul)

One Last Ovation For Mr. Robin Williams

justrollinon:

You made us laugh, you made us cry, you taught us that laughter can be the best medicine, you made us think, and reflect about the possibilities of what dreams may come.

Thank you

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4 must-read short stories by writers of color from the New Yorker

blackgirlstalking:

The newyorker is giving free access to their archives going back to 2007, and it inspired us to compile a short but hot list of must-reads for the rest of the summer. The website also has a new design that makes it easier to read long-forms like the ones listed below. Most of these selected…